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Glacial, Icecap and Permafrost Melting XLVII: Cordillera Blanca, Peru, 2008

Glacial, Icecap and Permafrost Melting XLVII: Cordillera Blanca, Peru, 2008

Peru: photographed March-April 2008.

This series focuses on the relationship between the desert coast where two-thirds of the country’s population lives and the mountains where about 80 percent of the country’s freshwater supply is located.  A Between the coast and the mountains runs a network of pipes and aqueducts conveying that water to people for crops, drinking and hydropower.

Much of Peru’s water comes from glacial runoff, particularly in the dry season. Glaciers in the Andes are melting. How soon they will be gone is a question that scientists are currently analyzing. In 2007 the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) predicted that: “Over the next 15 years, inter-tropical glaciers are very likely to disappear (IPCC, AR4 WGII, Chap. 13, p.583, 589). Some recent studies have been more conservative regarding the rate of melt.

Efforts to manage water supply are a big part of the human history in Peru, from the Nazca to the Moche, from the Incans to present-day society. This long and varied history of human cultures in Peru is embedded within the much longer geologic history evident in the mountains.

Anonymous, La Sabiduría junto con la Elocuencia, saca a Atahualpa del sepulcro, 1865

Anonymous, La Sabiduría junto con la Elocuencia, saca a Atahualpa del sepulcro, 1865

Glacial, Icecap and Permafrost Melting LI: Cordillera Blanca, Peru, 2008

Glacial, Icecap and Permafrost Melting LI: Cordillera Blanca, Peru, 2008
An area of glacial runoff near the Pastoruri glacier.

Glacial, Icecap and Permafrost Melting L: Cordillera Blanca, Peru, 2008

Glacial, Icecap and Permafrost Melting L: Cordillera Blanca, Peru, 2008

Photograph of mummy found in Ancon, Peru (1875), Alexander Agassiz

Mummy found in Ancon, Peru (1875)

Glacial, Icecap and Permafrost Melting LII: Cordillera Blanca, Peru, 2008

Glacial, Icecap and Permafrost Melting LII: Cordillera Blanca, Peru, 2008

Glacial, Icecap and Permafrost Melting LIX: Lake Paron, Peru, 2008

Glacial, Icecap and Permafrost Melting LIX: Lake Paron, Peru, 2008
Water storage project.

Glacial, Icecap and Permafrost Melting LVI:  Quebrada La Agonia, Peru, 2008

Glacial, Icecap and Permafrost Melting LVI: Quebrada La Agonia, Peru, 2008
Aqueduct to carry water from the Cordillera Blanca mountain range to the desert coast for agriculture and drinking water.

Glacial, Icecap and Permafrost Melting LVI:  Quebrada La Agonia, Peru, 2008

From the files related to Sert’s proposed master plan for rebuilding Chimbote, Peru after the city was destroyed in an earthquake in 1970

Glacial, Icecap and Permafrost Melting LX: CHAVIMOCHIC Project, La Libertad, Peru, 2008

Glacial, Icecap and Permafrost Melting LX: CHAVIMOCHIC Project, La Libertad, Peru, 2008

Glacial, Icecap and Permafrost Melting LIX: Lima, Peru, 2008

Glacial, Icecap and Permafrost Melting LIX: Lima, Peru, 2008

Glacial, Icecap and Permafrost Melting LIX: Lima, Peru, 2008

Ruins of the “Fortress of Paramonga,” constructed by the Kingdom of Chimor (c. 1200 to 1400 AD)

Glacial, Icecap and Permafrost Melting LVII: North of Lima, Peru, 2008

Glacial, Icecap and Permafrost Melting LVII: North of Lima, Peru, 2008
North of Lima development continues into the dry foothills with diminishing sources of water.

Glacial, Icecap and Permafrost Melting LIV: Carabayllo, Lima, Peru, 2008

Glacial, Icecap and Permafrost Melting LIV: Carabayllo, Lima, Peru, 2008
“Pueblo Joven”